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Senior Contributor

Ceilings

We are discussing so many different projects for our home, but what about our ceilings. Since my home was built in 1979, I have the popcorn ceiling. The shows I watch say that is so old taste, and that is the first thing they change. My SIL which is the painter has painted some of mine and they look great. We don't smoke so the ceilings to me look fine. If I am redoing rooms, do I spend the extra cost on the ceiling to stay in style? I hate to redo rooms and the first thing they notice is the old style ceiling. What is over your head?

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8 Replies
Frequent Contributor

Re: Ceilings

Our house was built in 1976 and we, too have the spray-on popcorn ceilings...ours even have sparkles (glitter?) in them.  When we redid one of the bathrooms a few years ago, Steve redid the ceiling and now it's smooth.  But that's not a very big ceiling to redo.  When we painted the living room/kitchen last fall, we kept the ceiling the same.  Too much space to redo.  And when I remake our bedroom this week, the ceiling stays the same!  If we ever decide to sell (we've been here 34 years so selling is not a strong possiblity) whoever buys the house can do what they like with the ceilings. Personally, I don't look up at the ceilings all that often, as evidenced by Steve coming home and asking when I intend to knock down the cobwebs! I tell him even spiders need a home!    Smiley Happy

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Honored Advisor

Re: Ceilings

We have a mixture.  Family room in the house, we did our own sheetrock, and the joints weren't perfect, so popcorn was the best camo for that.  I is nto pretty and I have been wanting to have son put up a wooden beaded ceiling in there, since the walls are light enough to carry it off.  That may come up this fall, depending upon his workload elsewhere. Rest of the house is plain Joan white or light blue flat sheetrock. 

Office walls are called "knockdown," which softens the lines and glare off of paint tremendously.  Ceilings out here are heavier texture of that...you'd look at them and say "Popcorn." 

I am a big fan of staying with what works for you.  A lot of this change for change's sake is just to get people to spend more money.  Ther are people who literally sit and plan style adn color obsolescence for a living...who do you htink brought back those putrid 1970s colors in clothing and decor items the past year or so?   I will come back and haunt anyone who'd dress my corpse in Harvest Gold or Avocado Green....

Do what you like.  It is YOUR home.  Anything that goes out of style will eventually come back in again, anyway.  It always does. 

If anyone comes over and points out your ceiling is out of date...well, you know how I am about people like that!

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Senior Contributor

Re: Ceilings

We have friends with popcorn ceilings and they were doing some work in one room and had to remove the popcorn. He said never again! It was a very difficult task getting the bumps off and very messy. I have forgotten the details but I remember how he talked about the mess.  I would no worry about what is in style on tv.

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Honored Advisor

Re: Ceilings

Soem friends of ours took down one high ceiling of it in theri dining room...it really didn't belong in a house the vintage of theirs.  It was hand scraping and re-finishing the ceiling with new sheets of gypsum board, whcih weighs a ton.  A real mess.  Not for the faint of heart. 

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Highlighted
soil guy
Senior Reader

Re: Ceilings

We sprayed the popcorn look in the 70's and have since removed it from the whole downstairs area.  It is messy to remove, but we just scraped it hard with a drywall knife and didn't worry about the uneven texture that was left behind.  We have had several compliments on the look and people have asked how we achieved it.  It's also very easy to paint now. 

 

The biggest problem is the mess and  keeping it contained as you scrape.  It would be easiest to have the room empty.  We have done it with furniture left in the room and all moved to one side and covered.    Then we did the other side of the room and had plastic on the floor to catch the fallout.  In my office we scraped and held a shopvac hose close to our work so we minimized the fallout and dust. 

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Senior Contributor

Re: Ceilings

I wanted to tear up the carpet in our dining room. The cat has recently done its thing in there and I though it was just poo -in but guess not.  When my in-laws lived there they had a dog that pee-d in the same area.  (so I keep blaming it on the dog!) We ran the carpet cleaner over it, but it has been so humid that I don't think the smell is gonna come out completely.  I pulled the carpet up over that area and my husband screamed at me...you did the same thing in the basement!  (we had water in the basement)  He wasn't too happy.  i would love to just tear up the carpet and have someone refinish the wood floors.  He says it will be colder in the winter...maybe I could just get a nice rug to put in the center of the floor  under the table then!  My cat has had some health problems and I am about to put him to sleep..I don't know if its arthritis or brain tumor. 

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Senior Contributor

Re: Ceilings

Since it is a bedroom and it looks okay and is not discolored I would leave it since it is not what I call a public area of the house.  If it was in the public areas, I would probably opt to remove it since it is dated.  I have heard that the textured surface tends to hold dust which is bad for allergies.  But it is your house...do what makes you happy.

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Honored Advisor

Re: Ceilings

If you do any shop-vac pickup with a drywall project, you need to use the right filter, or the fine particles can ruin your motor. 

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