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‘Daddy’s little girl’ holds new meaning on the farm

"It doesn't matter if you just got home from gymnastics or teh salon, when you return to the farma dn it's time for chores, all bets are off. As a girla I was expected to carry the full feed buckets just like my brother did, and I was expected to sort cattle, no matter how badly I wanted to  bo on the other side of teh fence. A farm fatehr will treat his daughters just like he treats his sons becuase the work has got to be done and tehre is no time to sit and look pretty."

 

Read more: http://www.farmandranchjobs.com/journal/daddys-little-girl-holds-new-meaning-on-the-farm/

 

Let me know what you think! Was it the same in your family?

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4 Replies
Honored Advisor

Re: ‘Daddy’s little girl’ holds new meaning on the farm

Being 61, I was a bit on the young side for the full-fledged Women's Lib movement.  Never burned a bra, as much as I just stopped wearing one for a while.  Still, if doing a man's work means you are liberated, I really was ahead of my time. 

 

Not very many girls worked in farming back then, the way my father worked me.  My husband always used to say that "God didn't give Clyde a son, because I have seen how he worked his daughter, and it would have been cruel, if he had thought he could work a boy any harder." 

 

I have mixed feelings about how that plays out longterm. If you worked me like a man, why not give me a chance to take over, instead of holding things back and making a golden oportunity for my BIL?  If I had to do it all, why not give me that chance?

 

Yes, I am grateful that I have a different background than most women my age, but I never got to stick around the house and learn to cook, clean, or manage a home.  I think it might have been a good thing to know those skills, instead of having to figure it out for myself.  It's still a struggle. 

 

There were a couple of times when I was badly injured, and once when I was poisoned, because my much smaller body couldn't take the absorption of pesticide through my skin, as well as the men in the field.  That was in tobacco, and it was terrifying to fall over in the floor and not be able to get up.

 

I do appreciate that I learned a set of skills few women my age ever think about knowing how to do, but it is hard to relate to other women as a "normal" female.  My experience is so very divergent from what girls my age typically did...I feel socially isolated except with my farming female friends online. 

 

Your piece is lighthearted and positive...there is a flipside, however.  Maybe it will be different for younger women, or now that more women are in ag than there used to be.  For their sake, I hope so. 

 

 

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Senior Contributor

Re: ‘Daddy’s little girl’ holds new meaning on the farm

My wife grew up on a farm in Iowa.  Her father set a curfew for her of midnight, explaining that because they lived on a farm, they needed to get up early to get things done.  He told her for every hour she was late, he would wake her up one hour early to go to work.  

Coming home at 3 in the morning, she found her father waiting up for her.  "The manure spreader is loaded and ready to go", he told her.  She asked if she could change clothes first, and found herself spreading manure at 3:30 in the morning!

Lesson learned....

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Senior Contributor

Re: ‘Daddy’s little girl’ holds new meaning on the farm

Really?  Rules are rules but that seems excessive. I do hope she got to change clothes.

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Senior Contributor

Re: ‘Daddy’s little girl’ holds new meaning on the farm

My dad was like the one described by Sharksoup.  We had a curfew and it didn't matter if it was my brother who was late or myself...the hog barn always needed a good cleaning and dad was either up waiting for us or we were up REALLY early the next morning to get to it.  I learned the first time but my brother never seemed to.  LOL 

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