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Veteran Contributor

Re: Home Alarms ??

The pistol is more for critters then humans.  I'm not buying a handgun until after I get my permit but I am looking at the .38.  It will take a bit of time to find something that I like and am comfortable gripping. 

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Veteran Contributor

Re: Home Alarms ??

It would strike me that if you are prepared to point a gun at someone you are going to have to be prepared to kill them.  So are  some of you saying your prepared to kill a person,   Thats what you do with guns is'nt it,    Kill things . Dont think i could live with that.

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Senior Contributor

Re: Home Alarms ??

If you had no choice, would you rather have been a victim or a survivor? That is what police officers do all the time. Make life and death decisions. I'm not arguing against training before handling a gun or counseling after a gun incident. Again, that is what happens in police academies and when an officer discharges a gun in the form of a debriefing. In the rural areas, you have to rely on yourself for security since it may take a long time for the police to arrive. How long do you think you would live after being shot or beaten by an intruder? Some of us do not want to find out, so we self-protect.

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Advisor

Re: Home Alarms ??

The point becomes this:  Unless you are willing to kill someone else and live with it, you may die because of your lack of willingness to place your survival first.  

It is easy to say that you would do "whatever it takes"; but, concealed weapons training is less about shooting skill and more about your understanding of when it is permissible in the eyes of the law for you to apply lethal force.  If you truly conisder this aspect of the process, it is not much different than being called fo jury duty on a capital case....ever been there?

As a woman of a certian age, with smoe physical informities, I can employ lethal force - whether weapon or my training - far sooner than you could, if you are a man in his prime.  Some people  might see that as a "priviliege," but I see it as a greater responsibility.  My judgment would be called into play - and possibly into question - at a much lower level of threat, by virtue of my own limitations. 

Also, we must consider the use of lethal force in the protection of others.,..when we perceive the threat of death or serious physical injury to another, is it a right or a responsibility to act? 

 

I have answered the DA in the affirmative, as to my ability to render a death sentence.  Some people deserve a good killing...usually far better an more humane than the one they dealt an innocent victim.  

I hope you never have to face the question, since you do not appear ready to provide an answer that preserves your own life, over that of some one who's decided to victimize you.  You are right: you never pick up a weapon unless you are prepared to use it for what it was designed to do.  I've considered that question, and am comfortable with my reply....

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Advisor

Re: Home Alarms ??

As someone who works with over 100 ex-offenders daily, one trait I see in almost all of them is impulsivity.  They simply lack the abilty to think through consequences.  They act on the spur of the moment with no empathy.  They cannot put themselves in anothers' shoes.  They live in the moment with no regard to the future.  In their minds, the crime they did is viewed as something that "happened", rarely something that they see themselves as consciously choosing to do.

 

They may think through breaking into a house or a car to steal something but throw the least little bit of unusual circumstances into that scenario and they act impulsively.  Do you really think that when they go to jack a car that they plan on a child being in the back seat?  Happened yesterday in Cincinnati.  How many times have you heard the phrase "robbery gone wrong" or "drug deal gone wrong".  They don't stop to think how they are compounding the problem.

 

This is the mindset of the criminal you are facing in a dark parking lot or on a street or the roadside or in your home.  You better be prepared to act.  They wil not stop to think before they act out on their victim. 

 

The decision to use lethal force is something you have to think through and reconcile within yourself before you ever pick up the weapon.  If you are faced with the situation, you probably are not going to have much time to think it through....while you are standing there thinking, your criminal has already moved into the impulsive mode.  If you cannot reconcile that in advance of ever possibly having to do it, you better buy an alarm and have a really big dog.

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Advisor

Re: Home Alarms ??

Your assessment is entirely correct. 

Yesterday's TKD class was focused on self-defense movements taken from Hapkido, an art much like Aikido.  In both, the movements and principle guiding them is to use the attacker's force, redirecting it to your advantage.  For instance, you use their reaching to grab you to make them overreach, which throws off their balance.  Loss of balance is a great disadvantage in a fight. 

Some of the students were low ranks, who had not done this part of our training before.  Our instructor told them that it takes 2000 repetitions of an action to make it a part of your practice. 

That sounds about right...so, if you buy a gun, and thus plan to use it, at least rehearse mentally - and frequently - how you will reach for it, release the safety and draw it when needed.  This does not mean to dwell on threat, which is too much of an anxiety response.  It means to put your weapon where you can easily access it, and not putting junk on top of it that will make it impossible to use it, if you find that necessary. 

Impulsivity is exactly what most of us responsible people stifle in our lives...we discipline our impulses and stem the desire to act without consideration of what is socially acceptable.  We try our best to adhere to rules, and they totally ignore that they even exist. 

I am dealing with one of these "victims" in a property co-ownership role right now.  According to her, the county didn't mail her tax bills last fall, the yearly listing form just turned up last week - from a first week of January mailing, the floors in a trailer she'd paid nothing for to her former employer had rotted through, and she could not believe the heirs of that employer didn't want to repair them for her at their expense. 

I had to pay the whole tax bill - two-thirds of which is her garbage pickup fees - to keep my name out of the newspaper next month as a delinquent taxpayer.  Meanwhile, two different banks were stupid enough to lend her what the entire property is worth, on her half of it.  Judgments abound.  My only option is a suit for partition...and yes, I walked into this situation knowing some of the above, but not nearly all of it. 

The property adjoins our family's farm, or I would have let it sit and rot.  Would have worked with her, if not for all the lies.  Actually, one lie is enough for me to part company.  Anyione who lies as glibly as this chick does has GOT to go. 

So, I am entering into about my 2000th repetition of "fixing someone else's mess."  Everyone is a damned victim...and I for one am full to the gills with hearing it.  What is it they say...if you are not a liberal when you are young, you have no heart, and if you are not a conservative when you are older, you have no brain?  I have aged long enough to have made that transition. 

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