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Senior Contributor

Magnets

Kay I am wondering if you are still using the mattress pad with magnets? We are but it is not easy to tell the results. I had misplaced the small quarter size magnets that I had purchased at that time but found them before the accident. Using the walker made my shoulder hurt and it was waking me at night. I put two of the magnets on my shoulder and it stopped the pain. Sunday I over did the exercise causing leg pain. I put the magnets where the pain was located and it went away. I just wish I had thought about putting the magnets on my leg when I first came home. I am finding the stress caused by pain and accidents causes the brain to focus on getting well and blocks out other things.

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4 Replies
Honored Advisor

Re: Magnets

Also, if the surgery to repair your fracture was under a general anesthesia, that makes me dumb as dirt for weeks afterwards.

On the mattress pad, it is hard to say definitively, because I am doing a lot of things at once, any of which could bear plus or minus on pain from arthritis. I quit taking my NSAID a few months ago, worried about my stomach lining. If I am hurting at bedtime, I take four 81 mg aspirin, instead of my usual one. That decisionmight cause me to have more pain than before...but, the aspirin absorb straight from the stomach, so the bit of relief is pretty quick, so I can drop off to sleep.

I have lost about thirty pounds in the past few months, which can really help my knees. Probably have given up a number of foods that are considered inflammatory, too. Those things could be making me feel less pain.

I train more often and generally harder now, so pro and con there? No pain right afterwards, when joints are loose, warm and lubricated. More the next morning, until after a hot bath...?

The magnet pad is on the bed in NC, and we sleep in VA about 3 nights a week now. I don't think it hurts, and it may help. For what it cost, it should.

One thing that really helps my thumb pain is the Tommie Copper fingerless gloves, which I wore all winter. Most of the swelling in my fingers and hands went away, and hasn't returned. Wish I could have worn their knee compression sleeves, but the latex in them caused me a world of hurt for several weeks, until the allergic reaction subsided. Their website fails to mention latex...says silicone. Big difference.

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Honored Advisor

PS

The truth is, most things work to an extent, if you just believe they do.  In nursing school, I learned, in General Psychology class, that the placebo effect can account for about 75% of people feeling better.  That can virtually equal the "benefits" of many anti=derpession medications. 

 

Yes, a sugar pill can make virtually almost as many  people feel mood improvement, as expensive medications.  Even some surgeries are really placebos.  Take my arthroscopic knee procedure of seven years ago.  That one is deemed by many to be a placebo procedure.  Wish I had known that then. 

 

In short, people feel better if they think something they do will make them feel better.  In studying mindfulness meditation, I also learned ot look inside my pains and aches.  Not to fret over them, but to sort of just "be" with them. 

 

Doing the deep and calm breathing helps me take my mind off of them, too.  When I lay me down to sleep, I start to settel in my breathing rhythm, and if I hurt too much to really relax, I take those extra three baby aspirin, then tell myself that it will feel better in a few minutes...it always does. 

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Senior Contributor

Re: PS

I know you are right on this one. DH never thinks anything will work so he does nothing.

My brain is beginning to work again. I must have got a double dose since the surgery was long.

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psyvandana
Friend

Re: Magnets

What matters more is the type of magnet used. not just the size. heres a good resource on magnetic therapy that goes in-depth into the polarities and magnet configurations.

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