cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Veteran Contributor

Rude kid in commercial

Does anyone else notice the rudeness of the children in some commercials? The one that bugs me right now is the Rice Krispie Bar commercial where the boy  is impatient and uses a disrespectful "tone" to his mother when she is asking him if he has everything he needs for school. I feel that children are watching these smart alecky kids and are now thinking that this is how you are supposed to speak to your parents.  I would never have accepted a child of mine speaking to me in that way, not ever, not once, and I'd make sure they never did it again.

 

I also hate the commercials where people have terrible table manners. Speaking with their mouths full drives me up a wall.  Lately is seem that every yogurt commercial has someone either eating out of the container with their fingers, licking them, or taking such a big bite that several seconds later when the guy tries to talk, it sounds like he has peanutbutter in his mouth! How tough is it to eat yogurt? Does it need chewing? No! Swallow it for heavens sake and THEN speak! 

 

It just seems that our standards of behavior and etiquette have just gone down the tubes.  I'm hoping for a pendulum swing back the other way. My Dad always had a saying.  When we'd go out and we'd notice a brat acting up in public, he would say "he wouldn't like it at our house". And he was right. 

0 Kudos
7 Replies
Advisor

Re: Rude kid in commercial

For some reason, people seem to think that bad manners in a kid are funny - whereas, we tend to think of them as sad.  I have a philosophy that a well-trained dog and a well-dissciplined child are both welcome just about anywhere, whereas either one out of control would be unwelcome almost everywhere. 

My pet peeve is the shows that make every adult white make look like an imbecile.  This character will usually be the father of  some nuclear or blended family.  He is made out to be so stupid, his kids and/or stepkids can hardly bear his ignorance, and make him the butt of every joke.  His wife tolerates him at best.  These comedies make me sad, too. 

The "norm" is woefully lacking now, but there are absolutely wonderful young parents out there, too.  I make it a point to compliment them when I meet them and their children. 

0 Kudos
Veteran Contributor

Re: Rude kid in commercial

I think what you observed in the media is refelctive of what our society in general is experiencing.  It is everywhere...in the classroom, on the streets, in customer service situations, on college campuses, on public transportation, you name it...

 

I am glad our grandkids are involved with sports, music, 4-H, church and other activities....I think it keeps them away from the influence of TV on young minds. 

 

We had granddaughter Brynn (4) overnight last night.....took her to Ed's home county fair for "dinner".  Had grandson Liam with us for Mass last Tuesday (5)......not a moment of bad behavior from either of them nor would it be tolerated by us or their parents. 

 

We cringe when we think of what our grandkids will face in their lives...the other post on the young woman with the badly behaved roommates is a good indication of what good kids everywhere will be facing in the next generation....

 

My brother just took a job as a school bus driver in the Phoenix area.  He is shocked at what the kids do.  He is a career truck driver and said he has heard and seen things in the past month that make him blush and shake his head...and the school acts as if they cannot do anything about it...

 

I probably sound like a broken record but I would be in NZ in a heartbeat if it wasn't for the kids and grands...sigh.....

0 Kudos
Advisor

Re: Rude kid in commercial

You mention the idea of becoming an ex-pat, which is something I am  hearing repeatedly around us lately.  My best friend's husband is a consulting MD, and he's gotten all hepped up about Belize.  So has the PA that does some of my spa services on the side of her regular medical practice. 

She and an MD at work have actually booked a trip there, to scope things out.  I half expect to text her for my next appointment, only to find she's left the country for good. 

Evidently, there is an annual publicity campaign or some service that identifies excellent places to emigrate to, where you can live in virtual paradise for peanuts.    Mike's cousin, who is just a year older than we are, moved with his wife and all their worldly possessions to an ex-pat settlement in Mexico, probably a year or two ago now. 

 

It troubles me to a certain extent that so many professionals appear ready to jump ship here...then again, like you and Ed, Mike and I have said that if not for our kids, we'd probably already be gone somewhere else.  It is very tempting to think about cashing out the real estate, putting the proceeds into insured deposits, and living off the interest and other investments, with plenty to spare. 

We could easily sell our two larger farms and move to my smallest one, and I have often dreamed about building my off-grid cabin there.  The only stopper right now is that it has not enough woodland for heating fuel.  I am still dropping hints about the cabin...but Mike wants it to be located in the mountains.  Must be the Welsh blood in him. 

It is a sad statement of affairs that Americans at midlife cannot see a comfortable future after a lifetime of hard work here, and feel drawn to leave our homeland to escape the weight of paying for other people's entitlements, because they do not want to work.  As an ant, I am tired of carrying the water for so many grasshoppers. 

Then again, I remember how "perfect" the little towns here in Carolina looked when we were scouting out this place 17 years ago, but we never pulled off the main street through town and saw their ratty back streets.  Now, I know that the beauty is them is only  a block or so deep. 

The farms looked lush in full growing season, but we learned our first winter here that no one felt that a bushel of bin-run grain to plant a cover crop would cashflow, so the soil just blew away all winter.  I thought I would go mad every gray and gritty winter, until Mike planted hay and some cover around the house, so I could see something green and didn't walk into a dust cloud every time I stepped outdoors. 

In short, I discovered that every place is just a place, and that a brief snapshot of it, during a vacation or a scouting trip, is hardly a good measure of how it is to actually live there longterm.  Some places are much "nicer" than others, but if you really dig deep enough, there are injustices and inconveniences pretty much everywhere. 

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Veteran Contributor

Re: Rude kid in commercial

It had never occured to me to EVER leave my own country, or for one of my kids to leave until recently.  About 5 years ago, my best friend started talking about better places to retire to make their retirement stretch further. Mexico was her first choice. She thought it was only fair, as eventually they say 40% of the Mexican population wants to live here, that would open up a whole lot of options for people heading the other direction. Not kidding.  But just in the last month, I started researching Caribbean veterinary schools for one of my kids. She wants to be a vet, and so far has not gotten into an American college, there doesn't seem to be enough seats for the demand and there are several ways around the licensing problems if you go to an out of country vet school, you can still intern and graduate from an American college at the end and have an American dvm degree.  So, I started looking into the many vet schools on the chain of islands leading south to South America.  One in particular caught my eye. It is brand new, very modern, run by American vets and professors, 90% of the student body is American and it is a little piece of paradise according to the onine hype. You scratch the surface and you see that there are pockets of paradise surrounded by acute poverty and far more crime than here in rural Iowa.  Let's face it, most places on this earth have far less crime than in rural Iowa.  But to live there all the time? Boy, I dont' know. 

 

When the new tax rates happen, and they probably will, it may seem a whole lot more enticing, but our retirement years are at least ten years away and by then there will be more grandchildren and I just don't know if we could leave year round. But maybe 8 months of the year and claim residence down there? Could be. I know I won't be willing to subsidize the dregs of society  to the extent that they are talking about now. No one helped me when I lost my farm in the 80's, we were "upside down" on that one for sure and no one gave a rip about us, but we rebuilt and it wasn't just  a home, it was our everything.  So, excuse me if I don't really care that someone's McMansion that they shouldn't have been in, in the first place has been taken from them. Those people didn't cry a river for me when Carters embargo crashed our farm economy and we lost a third generation farm and everything that went with it. 

 

So, no I don't PLAN to leave the country, but I do think it will depend on just how far I'm pushed. I will not participate in a socialist society, because as a "have" I know it will be MY bones being picked. Do a search on Antigua, it sounds like a very nice place on the surface, I know I'll be watching how it develops.

Tags (5)
0 Kudos
Veteran Contributor

Re: Rude kid in commercial

I actually heard Donald Trump say, in a recent interview, that he predicts that those who can afford it will leave this country if we continue down the economic path we are on.  I was rather surprised to hear him say that in public.  Many "celebrities" and wealthy people already own homes in other countries so it should not suprise us to see the out migration by those who have the means. 

 

It is not just the economy and the socialistic direction we are headed that bothers me.  It is the lifestyle here that is just not what I expected to see in my retirement years.  The rudeness, the entitlements, the lack of morality, the consumptiveness, the rejection of Christian beliefs, the crime, the refusal to defend our borders....I could go on and on....

 

I agree that it is hard, as a tourist, to really get to know what it would be like to live in a different country.  We have visited many, many foreign countries and Caribbean islands and the tourist's view is very limited.  I will say that Antiqua and Costa Rica are my favorites.  Actually Puerto Rico is but that is a US territory so I guess they have the same tax issues as we do.  We will visit Panama this winter and have heard that it is a wonderful place for ex-pats....we'll see.

 

What was different when we went to NZ was the length of stay AND the fact that we were not there as tourists.  While we had a couple of weekends to look around on our own, the bulk of our time was on farms, with farm families, or at farm-related businesses or at universities involved in agricultural studies.  That gave us the opportunity to see the country from a different perspective....our perspective...the perspective of those who live and work there in a career other than hospitality industry. 

 

I would never (I guess...lolol) move half way around the world away from my kids and grands.....I just wish we could take them all with us and make a life there. 

 

When my country that I love begins to respect the values and principles that made us the greatest and most free nation on earth I will gladly live out my remaining days here.  Until then, I will just keep hoping and praying, allthewhile, knowing in my heart that things are not good here.   

0 Kudos
Advisor

Re: Rude kid in commercial

You are right, but one of my favorite movies was ferris beuller's day off. the whole movie made adults look like fools( to it's credit, no cussing or violence). I guess the media plays what sells.

0 Kudos
Advisor

Re: Rude kid in commercial

The experience of moving here from Virginia, with the changes in weather events alone - 75 miles due north really tempers hurricanes most times, for instance - was enough of a shock to our systems.  Add to that moving from well-drained soils to trying to  grow forages on marginal swampland, and it's double trouble. 

I remember friends back home who'd bought a house in a subdivision that had been sited nd developed in a long drought spell  - and some strings of years are just generally drier than others, even if not true multi-year droughts.  When the regular rainfall pattern reinstituted itself, their home started to have all sorts of foundation problems.   

Geologists and soil scientists eventually agreed that certain areas in the central part of the state were Triassic basins, ancient inland seabeds.  The soils there do a shrink-swell trick taht degies imagination.  I suspect that we're on a similar formation here, but no one's ever made an issue of it, since it's so sparsely populated...also, we've set certain soils as not eligible for development at all in this county.  . 

When it came time for our daughter and SIL to settel down, they started otu with a mobile home.  It was first set up next to his great-grandparents on their farm.  With ownership a real snarled mess there, we offered them roughly six acres here.  The only condition I attached  was that they had to set the trailer here and live in it for a year before deciding whether or not it was a suitable site. 

It was and still is probably the prettiest place on the farm, but until you've been through all seasons somewhere, you haven't  got a clue if it will make a decent homestead.  Other than not being as isolated a site as I personally prefer, it is a perfect spot for a home. 

If I were to decide to try any other place to live but here or one of the houses on Mike's place back home, I would try my best to follow this "live a year there" policy before buying or building.  In general, I view rent as a waste of money; but, if it prevents a real big mistake in settling permanently in the wrong place, it's money well spent. 

0 Kudos