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Frequent Contributor

flooding in N.D.

I have seen on the news that N.D. is having severe flooding .Wondering how Manureseller is doing.

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20 Replies
vipin_sps
Friend

Re: flooding in N.D.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency is expected to help firefighters across Texas in their ongoing battle against the many out-of-control wildfires that are burning on nearly 400 square miles.

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Agro & Farming

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Veteran Contributor

Re: flooding in N.D.

Other then the horses should have arm floaties on we are doing good.  We generally are far enough out of the valley that we don't get the overland flooding other then general field runoff through the pasture.  They closed I-29 from Fargo to Hillsboro due to water over the road.  It took over 3 hours to get to Grand Forks from Fargo which is normally an hour 20 drive.  This some of the worst overland flooding I've seen since '97.  Fargo should be good now but towns north won't fair as well. 

And yes the fires are bad down south.  Extreme drought conditions have really been hurting the south.  I have a few friends in OK and TX that are dealing with no crop, no pasture, no water and wild fires.   Here we are sitting extremely welll for water and those to the south are hurting.....it doesn't seem to be a happy medium anywhere for agriculture.

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Senior Contributor

Re: flooding in N.D.

wouldn't it be amazing if we could control the weather and send it where needed?

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Senior Contributor

Re: flooding in N.D.

I've always thought that we should build a big pipeline accross the country  to move the flood waters to where they could do some good.   If  the Red River ran to the South  it would probably make it to Texas and Oklahoma.    Good luck  to ND and Minnesota.  

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Senior Contributor

Re: flooding in N.D.

That would create its own set of problems. Who would control the weather controllers so the weather would actually go where it is needed? If it would be anything like the oil markets, 20% of the weather price would go to the controllers. LOL!

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Veteran Contributor

Re: flooding in N.D.

If you really want to see something look up Devils Lake, ND and see how large that lake has grown since the late '80s.  I know a lot of farmers out that way would be more then willing to pipe water down south to help out.  There is so much farmland lost to that lake it's unbelieveable and they are still paying taxes on that land. 

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Honored Advisor

Re: flooding in N.D.

Has the lake grown due to deforestation or what other causes?  Increased cleared land or hardscape ( like paved roads and parking lots) can make of a lot more runoff. 

I am surprised that the land is still deemed owned by individuals once innundated, unless that is a seasonal underwater status.  Here in NC, we've been told that once land is under water, it belongs to the state. 

That is one of the biggest legal manifestations of climate change, if it results in sea  level rise.  And, I was recently told, once it is innundated and reverts to teh public domain, it doesn't reutrn to private owenrship if levels fall. 

Water rights and property rights are intriguing legal territory.  Lawyers and their clients will be spending increasingly time and money defining this area, and many wars are expected to be fought over water in the century ahead.  Some that we think of as being fought for other reasons already have to do with water. 

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Senior Contributor

Re: flooding in N.D.

The lake has grown so large over the last 20+ years it is outrageous!  There is a outlet that goes into Canada but most of the time it isn't running due to fights with the Canadians.  Devils Lake and Stump Lake are now 1 big lake with only a small eroding dam pretty much holding the entire lake back from massive distruction of down streams towns and farmland.  If the silt should break loose there would be such a massive and fast flood that loss of life would be astrinomical. 

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Honored Advisor

Re: flooding in N.D.

You know, I recently read a book on how different disasters result in various causes of death that actually kill people, and which are the most destructive in terms of major loss of life. 

Tornadoes do a lot of slashing from cast-about debris,  and cause loss of blood.  There are crushing injuries, but the deaths are usually not so concentrated or high in number.  Paths are generally narrow, and good warning systmes are in place. 

Fire generally gives you a fair warning, too.  I think more people a fearful of fire, and give it a wider berth when wildfire breaks out. 

Water is the big killer...flash flooding from storms, snowmelt, tsunami, and dam breaks are often very sudden, little warning is given, and thus, loss of life is generally huge, comparatively speaking. 

I hope you folks stay safe.  One barn had twenty horses killed in a collapse yesterday here.  Many more are on the lose, and are thus at risk from cars and other risks.  I am sure a lot of fences got taken out by falling trees.   

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